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Food, Moldova, Peace Corps

Bostoniada

Today was a harvest/pumpkin festival in Lozova, called Bostoniada (Boston-yada), Boston being the Moldovan word for Pumpkin. In order to help raise money for a  Junior Achievement team in Lozova that is run by my LTI, Rodica and for a TB charity in Balti, I decided to help with a food booth some fellow PCVs were organizing.

Last Sunday, a week before the event, I traveled to Lozova with some fellow PCVs to teach a marketing class to the high school english club there and then help the students design a marketing plan for their event. I was impressed by how creative the students were – coming up with fantastic slogans, giving great feedback on some of our marketing ideas, making all the booth signage and putting up other flyers around the town. We wanted the kids to be as involved as possible in the process since it was raising money for their program, we wanted them to be invested in it. Also we saw having them do the marketing as a learning experience for them and a chance to delegate some of our work.

Booth Name: ‘Traditie Americii‘ (American Tradition)

Main slogan: ‘Simpte gustul americii in mincare noastra’ (Feel the American taste in our food)

Name your price: ‘Pretul tau penteu caritate’  (Your price for charity)

Pie walk: ‘Norocul tau te va hrani’ (Your luck will feed you)

During our first trip to Lozova (last Sunday for the marketing class) we got off at the wrong stop and got a little lost. We ended up wandering down several muddy paths, using a phone GPS and making several calls to describe where we were to Rodica, before arriving at the school.

During our first trip to Lozova (last Sunday for the marketing class) we got off at the wrong stop and got a little lost. We ended up wandering down several muddy paths, using a phone GPS and making several calls to describe where we were to Rodica, before arriving at the school.

Arriving at the school in Lozova.

Arriving at the school in Lozova.

Teaching the kids about the basics of marketing.

Teaching the kids about the basics of marketing.

Sunday morning I awoke at 5:30a to catch the bus from Stauceni to Chisinau and then the bus from PC headquarters in Chisinau to Parcul Izivor and from there to Lozova. Overall it look us just over two hours to make our way from Stauceni to Lozova. Since the festival didn’t start till 11a, we had some time to get set up before the day began.

Overall, the day was a HUGE success. We sold out of all of our pumpkin sweets – over fifty huge pumpkin pies, three large containers of pumpkin cookies, pumpkin bread and pumpkin bars, pumpkin dulceata (dulch-atsa; which is similar to a sweet, thick jam). We also sold out of 20 kilos of pumpkin macaroni and cheese, collected a lot of donations and I literally sold the banana off my head – so we raised a lot of money for two really good causes. The event was a great learning experience about effective marketing, raising money for charity in Moldova and how to run a successful food booth at a family festival in Moldova. It was also a wonderful chance to interact and practice my Romanian on a lot of really friendly people who attended the event and to work with some wonderful kids and PCVs.

Our booth - Traditia Americana, with Rodica and few of the kids and PCVs.

Our booth – Traditia Americana, with Rodica and few of the kids and PCVs.

Another vendor at the festival. While I spent very little time outside the booth, the festival had all kinds of amazing, traditional Moldovan goods, food and produce.

Another vendor at the festival. While I spent very little time outside the booth, the festival had all kinds of amazing, traditional Moldovan goods, food and produce.

Our neighboring booth was a friendly wine vendor  who loved socializing and giving wine to all the volunteers we had working.

Our neighboring booth was a friendly wine vendor who loved socializing and giving wine to all the volunteers we had working.

A traditional Moldovan group on the stage at the festival.

A traditional Moldovan group on the stage at the festival.

The crowd mid-day at the festival.

The crowd mid-day at the festival.

Another musical act the festival.

Another musical act the festival.

Heading out of the festival, loaded down with our supplies.

Heading out of the festival, loaded down with our supplies.

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Discussion

6 thoughts on “Bostoniada

  1. I want to thank you for everything you are doing for our people, for young generation mostly, You guys are great and please don’t pay attention to some stupid comments some people make, they still leave in the dark. carry on 🙂

    Posted by anushka | May 8, 2014, 4:24 am

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